Daily Archives: May 17, 2019

Late Night MRI’s

Friends of Padre Steve’s World,

Well for the second time in two weeks I am making a trip for an MRI of a knee deep in the night at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth. They do quite the business there, the MRI and CT suite is in operation 24/7 all year long. My last MRI revealed more damage to my right knee, but it looks like it will not require a knee replacement, but an alternative to have Interventional Radiology cauterize the nerves to the right knee. The bone and joint surgeon doesn’t think that majority of the pain is coming from the knee itself and he wouldn’t want to replace the knee and have no reduction in the pain. I am now waiting for that procedure to be scheduled.

My left knee, which will be scanned tonight, about 1:30 AM was operated on to repair a torn meniscus in February. It now hurts worse than it ever did. The surgeon who did the original surgery mentioned that I probably will need a knee replacement at some time. All I hope is that the results of this MRI give a way forward to either fix or reduce the pain in my left knee. If it requires replacement fine, if the pain can be controlled with the treatment by Interventional Radiology, I would be very happy.

I should know something on that in the next week or so. The surgeon who did the original surgery has been great about keeping in contact, providing test results as soon as he has access to them, even on weekends, and providing additional referrals.

So, I will drive over to the hospital about midnight and hopefully they will be get me in earlier. I really don’t like to be on the road at such an hour. If all goes well I’ll be home and in bed by 3:00 AM. I need to be up by 9:30 to watch Bayern München play for the Bundesliga championship.

So until tomorrow,

Peace,

Padre Steve+

Advertisements

9 Comments

Filed under healthcare, Loose thoughts and musings

Musing on Potential War With Iran

Friends of Padre Steve’s World,

I am a veteran of Iraq, and have participated in maritime operations in the Arabian/Persian Gulf.

I am not comfortable with the steps the administration is taking with Iran, not that I am any fan of the Ayatollahs and their aggressive theocratic-religious-military-dictatorship. While I had always dreamed of a military career it was the failure of the attempt to rescue the hostages taken by the Iranians in April 1980, Operation Eagle Claw that was the tipping point for me to explore my options about joining the military. 1980 was the year I transferred to California State University, albeit to study history, but mostly because Judy, my girlfriend was going there. Once I got there I started checking out the various ROTC programs and enlisted as a simultaneous membership program between Army ROTC and the California Army National Guard in 1981.

I thought back then at sometime we would go to war with Iran but as years passed I thought that maybe both sides would find a way to peacefully co-exist, at least within limits, especially after my experiences in the Gulf where the regular Iranian Navy chased Iraqi Oil Smugglers into our hands. Of course there was the time some Revolutionary Guard patrol boats harassed our squadron Flagship, an Australian Special Forces Support ship and we sped to her assistance at full speed with guns and missiles armed and ready to go to war. They withdrew and nothing came out of it, but for about an hour it appeared that we would be the first U.S. Navy ship to engage the Iranians since the Tanker Wars Of the late 1980s. The fact is that the Revolutionary Guard Naval Corps operates in a different world from the regular Iranian Navy.

If we go to war, now I know two things about the Arabian/Persian Gulf and the Iranians have built up a formidable asymmetric naval and capability. A large number small submarines, not high tech, but in large numbers hard to kill. Likewise, would deploy large numbers of fast attack boats and craft armed with a variety of missiles and guns for swarm attacks on otherwise better armed and more capable warships. We prepared for those back in 2002, but the lethality of the Iranians has increased, as has their number of anti-ship missile batteries his increased exponentially, as has their number of short and medium range ballistic missiles. While their AirPower is antiquated by American standards they have better and more advanced air defense systems, supplied by Russia. They are also supported by Shia Muslim militants in Iraq, Syria, Yemen, and even in Bahrain, headquarters of the U.S. 5th Fleet.

The Iranians have the capability of shutting down the Straits of Hormuz, and their allies in Yemen have showed the capability to attack shipping in the Bab El Mendeb, the Southern entrance to the Red Sea and a vital shipping lane in its own right.

Unfortunately, the Trump administration has severely weakened our ties with key allies that routinely contribute Naval and air forces to the security of the Gulf.

Over the past few weeks an otherwise routine deployment to the region by the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, was sped up, B-52 bombers were deployed, and a proposal to send 120,000 troops to the Gulf was revealed. Four merchant ships were allegedly damaged by saboteurs, but no hard evidence points to Iran, and the damage to all the ships was minimal. The embassy staff in Baghdad was reduced over alleged threat increases that the American Commander in Iraq denies. The threats were reported by Israeli sources, much like the evidence that led us into war with Iraq in 2003.

I cannot put my finger finger on it, but something is not right about this situation. We are in no way ready for a major war with Iran, not with the possibility a potential war with North Korea, a trade war with China, and Russian threats to NATO allies or friendly nations in Eastern Europe.

This does not feel right to me. I’ve been around and seen and know too much. Maybe it’s my education military history, and high level Joint Operations education. Maybe it is my nearly 38 years serving in both the Army and Navy, including about 7 years with the Marines. Maybe it’s my long experience working with allies. I don’t know. All I know is that when domestic troubles embroil a national leader, the solution is often found in war. War allows leaders to do things impossible under peacetime constraints.

I can only speculate what is going on, but my hermeneutic os suspicion says to ask “why this administration, why Iran, why now?”

I wish I had the answer, but something doesn’t seem right, and I am worried for the many friends I have serving in the Gulf.

Until tomorrow,

Peace

Padre Steve+

6 Comments

Filed under Foreign Policy, History, iraq, middle east, Military, national security, US Navy, War on Terrorism