When Generosity is Viewed as Oppression

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Friends of Padre Steve’s World

I decided to weigh in last week about the Recalcitrant County Clerk of Rowan County Kentucky, Mrs. Kim Davis who now sits in jail on a contempt of court citation while her supposedly Christian lawyers make appeals and gather money for their next case. Sadly they will throw Mrs. Davis to the curb when she no longer is profitable, but that is modern American Christianity. No wonder people are fleeing the church, and why most non-believers have such a negative view of Christianity. That, my friends, as unpalatable as it may sound is the truth, and the numbers bear it out.

Now my endeavor wrought several articles, all of which were based in fact, reason, and a dispassionate attempt to wade through the morass of what was happening. I expected some negative comments from conservative Christians but hoped, maybe beyond hope that most would actually take the time to read, think through and consider what I said; but that was a forlorn hope. What passes for conservative Christianity in this country is little different than what passes for fundamentalist Islam in the Middle East; the followers of both major in the minors of their religion and fail to follow the basic tenants of their belief. Most, given the chance and government sanction would kill any who they deem heretics.

That is why I totally agree with Mark Twain, who said, “Concentration of power in a political machine is bad; and an Established Church is only a political machine; it was invented for that; it is nursed, cradled, preserved for that; it is an enemy to human liberty, and does no good which it could not better do in a split-up and scattered condition.”

That, at least to my conservative religious readers may seem like heresy; but it is true. It does not matter what the religion is, or whom they call “God,” when it becomes an Established Church and political machine, as are the heavy hitting politicians, pundits and preachers supporting Mrs. Davis, it is an evil that must be confronted by any person of conscience.

A couple of days ago I posted a new policy regarding comments. It was met by the scorn, hatred, and derision of a number of supposedly Christian people. The fact is I don’t have to allow abusive people to try to hijack my site for their purposes.

I tried to be nice. I tried to be polite, and I tried my best to understanding and to listen to them. That got me nowhere with these people. Instead they played the aggrieved victims of my “intolerance.”

So here is the deal. I am not even going to allow such comments on my site, comments, which though masked in the gentle words of faith, are hateful and intolerant, nor am I going to respond to them. I tried. I tried reason, I allowed the comments, I attempted dialogue; but such is not respected or appreciated by these “true believers” and it is a waste of my time and effort to attempt this. Even Jesus told his disciples to shake the dust off of their sandals when they encountered such people. It is sad that the current so-called disciples of Jesus in this country don’t understand this important distinction.

The thing is that while these people claim the mantle of God and desire the power of the state in order to impose their beliefs on others, they do so from the aspect of weakness because they want power but have lost it.

Eric Hoffer wrote, “It has often been said that power corrupts. But it is perhaps equally important to realize that weakness, too, corrupts. Power corrupts the few, while weakness corrupts the many. Hatred, malice, rudeness, intolerance, and suspicion are the faults of weakness. The resentment of the weak does not spring from any injustice done to them but from their sense of inadequacy and impotence. We cannot win the weak by sharing our wealth with them. They feel our generosity as oppression.”

I have been generous. I have been kind, and I have been gracious in allowing such people a venue. That generosity was scorned because of their sense of inadequacy and impotence. I cannot fix that and I have a life, I don’t need to waste the time I have responding to such people. Jesus didn’t. Why should I?

Have a great day and take care,

Peace

Padre Steve+

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9 Comments

Filed under christian life, faith, philosophy, Political Commentary, Religion

9 responses to “When Generosity is Viewed as Oppression

  1. Karen Folkerts

    You are a very wise man Padre.

  2. Pam

    Good job, Padre. I stand with you.

  3. It sounds like these abusive commenters aren’t interested in any sort of real discussion. The point of the comments is to silence dissenting viewpoints. Therefore, as they are not real discussion, they’re not worth reading or posting. I’m totally supportive of your policy.

  4. Bill McReynolds

    As the Chief of Naval Operations himself recently utilized a descriptive, linguistic term that I will say could be interpreted as High level “Staffese”? I am very glad you are putting a stop to all of the attack comment JACKASSERY responses to your Blog, Padre!
    Well done, man.

  5. mrmoteeye

    I was thinking earlier today while I listened to the Beatles’ lyric ” imagine no religion” (sitting in Cafe Java) that the words are essentially reference to faux religion to which Padre refers. The great universal spirit of goodness and purity, God, is best respected by scorning this mean spirited and power minded religion we see so much lately, whether it be ISIS or the Christian Fundies.

  6. Padre,

    Keep smiling and don’t let them see you sweat.

  7. You have done us a favor in this. I have long practiced avoidance of discussions with the closed minded. There is no return on the investment of self when speaking to those who only demand an opportunity to beat their chests and scream out their poison. They do not hear nor consider any concept other than their own. I am done with them.

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