Iconic and Heroic: The Fletcher Class Destroyers

Friends of Padre Steve’s World, After a tiring week it is a rerun Friday night. This is an older article about a class of ship that in the darkest days of the Second World War and through the Cold War was a symbol of American might and ingenuity. The Fletcher class destroyers were iconic. When I think of the classic destroyer it is the Fletcher class that comes to mind. The were fast, beautiful and deadly. They helped win the war against Japan in the Pacific and fought in some of the most desperate sea engagements the world has seen. After the war ships of the class served in the US and allied navies for decades, the last , the former USS John C. Rodgers was decommissioned by Mexico in 2001. They were amazing ships manned by heroic sailors.
Have a great night and expect to see more new articles about the Gettysburg campaign in the coming week as I am getting ready for my new class at the Staff College.
Peace
Padre Steve+

Padre Steve's World: Official Home of the Anti-Chaps

The USS Fletcher DD-445

If ever a class of warships can define a ship type the destroyers of the Fletcher Class were that. The most numerous of all United States Navy destroyer classes the Navy commissioned 175 of these ships between June 1942 and February 1945.  There were two groupings of ships the 58 round or “high bridge” ships and the 117 square or “low bridged” ships. It was a sound design that would be modified for use in the later Allen M. Sumner and Gearing Class destroyers.  Eleven shipyards produced the ships fast, heavily armed and tough the ships would serve in every theater of the war at sea but would find their greatest fame in the Pacific where many became synonymous with the courage and devotion of their officers and crews.

USS Stevens one of the 6 Fletchers equipped with an aircraft catapult

The ships were a major improvement on previous classes of…

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