Marine Aviators at Guadalcanal: The Sacrifice of VMF-221 and VMSB-241


A Brewster Buffalo of VMF-221 

Friends of Padre Steve’s World,

Today on June 5th I am posting several articles on the Battle of Midway which was fought between June 4th and June 6th 1942. It was the turning point of the World War Two in the Pacific.

One of the more overlooked aspects of the Battle of Midway are the sacrifices of Marine Fighter Squadron VMF-221 on the morning of June 4th 1942 and Marine Bombing Squadron VMSB-241 that morning and on June 5th.

The Marine aviators of VMF-221 flew a mixture of 21 obsolescent Brewster F2A-3 Buffalos and 7 newer Grumman F4F-3 Wildcats. On the morning of June 4th they engaged a vastly superior force of Japanese Navy aircraft as the Japanese squadrons vectored toward Midway and its air station to begin softening it up for the planned invasion.

Led by Major Floyd Parks the squadron had arrived at Midway on Christmas day 1941 being delivered by the USS Saratoga after the aborted attempt to relieve Wake Island.  The squadron along with Marine Scout Bombing Squadron 241 (VMSB 241) formed Marine Air Group 22. The squadron that Parks brought with him was comprised of just 14 aircraft, all F2A-3’s. The squadron was augmented by 7 more F2A-3s and 7 of the more advanced F4F-3 Wildcats before the battle. The fighter pilots of VMF-221 scored their first victory of the war shooting down a Japanese Kawanishi H8K2 “Emily” flying boat.

F2F-3 Brewster Buffalo 

When the Japanese First Carrier Striking Group was spotted in the wee hours of June 4th the Marines and other Navy and Army Air Force aircrews aboard Midway scrambled to meet them.  The 18 SBD-2 Dauntless’ and 12 Vought SB2-U3 Vindicator dive bombers of VMSB-241 along with the 6 new TBF Avengers belonging to Torpedo Squadron Eight, 4 Army Air Corps B-26 Marauders and 15 B-17 Flying Fortresses flew out to attack the Japanese carriers.  Meanwhile the fighters of VMF-221 rose to intercept the 108 Japanese aircraft heading toward Midway. The 72 strike aircraft, 36 Aichi 99 Val Dive Bombers and 36 Nakajima B5N Torpedo/ High Level Bombers were protected by 36 AM6-2 Zeros. The Japanese Zeros thoroughly outclassed their Marine opponents in speed, maneuverability and in the combat experience of their pilots.

The Marines audaciously attacked the far superior Japanese force, throwing themselves against the Japanese phalanx with unmatched courage.  Despite their courage the Marine fighters were decimated by the Japanese Zeros.  The Marines shot down 4 Val dive bombers and at least three Zeros but lost 13 Buffalos and 3 Wildcats during the battle.  Of the surviving aircraft only three Buffalos and three Wildcats were in commission at the end of the day. Among the casualties killed was Major Parks.  Of the surviving pilots of VMF-221, two became “Aces” during the war. Lieutenant Charles M. Kunz would later fly in VMF-224, adding six victories to end the war with 8 victories. Capt. Marion E. Carl would later fly in VMF-223 and was credited with 18.5 Japanese aircraft shot down.  Other pilots like Second Lieutenant Clayton M. Canfield shot down two additional aircraft while flying with VMF-223, while Second Lieutenant Walter W. Swansberger won the Medal of Honor at Guadalcanal.

The last remaining Marine fighter pilot of VMF-221 from the battle of Midway, Williams Brooks died in January 2010 and was buried with full military honors in Bellview , Nebraska.  Brooks in his after action report described his part in the battle:

I was pilot of F2A-3, Bureau number 01523, Our division under Capt. Armistead was on standby duty at he end of the runway on the morning of June 4, 1942, from 0415 until 0615. At about 0600, the alarm sounded and we took off. My division climbed rapidly, and I was having a hard time keeping up. I discovered afterwards that although my wheels indicator and hydraulic pressure indicator both registered “wheels up”, they were in reality about 1/3 of the way down. We sighted the enemy at about 14,000 feet, I would say that there were 40 to 50 planes. At this time Lt. Sandoval was also dropping back. My radio was at this time putting out no volume, so I could not get the message from Zed. At 17,000 feet, Capt. Armistead led the attack followed closely by Capt. Humberd. They went down the left of the Vee , leaving two planes burning. Lt. Sandoval went down the right side of the formation and I followed. One of us got a plane from the right side of the Vee. At this time, I had completely lost sight of my division. As I started to pull up for another run on the bombers, I was attacked by two fighters. Because my wheels being jammed 1/3 way down, I could not out dive these planes, but managed to dodge them and fire a burst or so into them as they went past me and as I headed for the water. As I circled the island, the anti-aircraft fire drove them away. My tabs, instruments and cockpit were shot up to quite an extent at this time and I was intending to come in for a landing. 

It was at this time that I noticed that a important feature in their fighting. I saw two planes dog-fighting over in the east, and decided to go help my friend if at all possible. My plane was working very poorly, and my climb was slow. As I neared the fight both planes turned on me. It was then that I realized I had been tricked in a sham battle put on by two Japs and I failed to recognize this because of the sun in my eyes. Then I say I was out-numbered, I turned and made a fast retreat for the island, collecting a goodly number of bullets on the way. After one of these planes had been shaken, I managed to get a good burst into another as we passed head-on when I turned into him. I don’t believe this ship could have gotten back to his carrier, because he immediately turned away and started north and down. I again decided to land, but as I circled the island I saw two Japs on a Brewster. Three of my guns were jammed, but I cut across the island, firing as I went with one gun. But I could not get there in time to help the American flier and as soon as the Brewster had gone into the water I came in for a landing at approximately 0715 (estimated). 

VMF-221 was composed of the following aircraft and pilots.

FIRST DIVISION (F2A-3)

Plane # Bu.No.  Pilot                                                               Status

MF-1     01518    Maj. Floyd B. Parks USMC                          MIA

MF-2     01548    2nd Lt. Eugene P. Madole USMCR            MIA

MF-3     01525    Capt. John R. Alvord USMC                        MIA

MF-4     01537    2nd Lt. John M. Butler USMCR                   MIA

MF-5     01569    2nd Lt. David W. Pinkerton Jr. USMCR      MIA

MF-6     01552    2nd Lt. Charles S. Hughes USMCR, Did not engage, turned back due to Engine problems

 

SECOND DIVISION (F2A-3)

Plane # Bu.No.  Pilot                                                                 Status

MF-7     01552    Capt. Daniel J. Hennessey USMC              MIA

MF-8     01541    2nd Lt. Ellwood Q. Lindsay USMCR                 MIA

MF-9     01524    Capt. Herbert T. Merrill USMC                   Bailed out WIA

MF-10   01528    Capt. Herbert T. Merrill USMC            MIA

MF-11   01568    Capt. Phillip R. White USMC                       Survived

MF-12   01542    2nd Lt. John D. Lucas USMCR                      MIA

 

THIRD DIVISION (F2A-3)

Plane#  Bu.No.  Pilot                                                               Status

MF-13   01562    Capt. Kirk Armistead USMC                      Survived

MF-14   01563    2nd Lt. William B. Sandoval USMCR         MIA

MF-15   01553    Capt. William C. Humberd USMC            Survived

MF-16   01523    2nd Lt. Williams V. Brooks USMCR           WIA

MF-17   01521    2nd Lt. Charles M .Kunz USMCR               WIA

MF-18   01559    2nd Lt. Martin E. Mahannah USMC           KIA (his body washed up later)

23 (F4F-3) 3989  2nd Lt. Walter W. Swansberger USMCR   Survived

 

FOURTH DIVISION (F2A-3)

Plane # Bu.No.  Pilot                                                                Status

MF-19   01520    Capt. Robert E. Curtin USMC                     MIA

MF-20   01550    2nd Lt. Darrell D. Irwin USMCR                       Survived

 

FIFTH DIVISION (F4F-3)

 

Plane # Bu.No.  Pilot                                                                Status

22           4008       Capt. John F. Carey USMC                          WIA

24           4000       Capt. Marion E. Carl USMC                         Survived

25           3997       2Lt. Clayton M. Canfield USMCR                Survived

26           4006       Capt. Francis P. McCarthy USMC               MIA

27           2532       2nd Lt. Roy A. Corry USMC                              Survived

28           1864       2nd Lt.Hyde Phillips USMCR                            Did not engage, mechanical problems

As for VMF-221 it was re-equipped with the F4F-4 and later with the F4U Corsair during the course of two more deployments overseas.  VMF-221 finished the war with a score of 155 victories, 21 damaged and 16 probable kills, the second highest total of any Marine Corps Squadron during the war.

SB2-U2 Vindicator of VMSB 241 at Midway

Their bomber counterparts of VMSB 241 attacked the Japanese task force on the morning of June 4th and scored no hits while losing 8 aircraft. The survivors were again in action later in the day as well as the following day where they helped sink the Japanese Heavy Cruiser Mikuma with with Captain Richard Fleming diving his mortally wounded Vindicator into the cruiser’s number four 8” gun turret.

The Mikuma Sinking after being bombed by Marine and Navy Dive Bombers – the wreck of Major Henderson’s Vindicator is atop the number four turret 

While the Marines’ actions are not as well known or as successful as those of their Navy counterparts they were brave.  The inexperienced Marine fighter pilots had to engage some of the most experienced pilots flying superior machines. The bomber crews had little to no experience before being thrown into combat. As we remember the sacrifices made by the men of Midway let us not forget the gallant men of VMF-221 and VSMB-241.

Peace

Padre Steve+

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Filed under History, leadership, US Army Air Corps, US Marine Corps, World War II at Sea, world war two in the pacific

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